Pattern Recognition, by Ian Sigalow
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Pattern Recognition, by Ian Sigalow

Pattern Recognition is a journal of thoughts and strategies on venture capital investments.


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“What Are You Investing In Now?”

Posted on August 12th, 2016.

Hardly a day goes by when someone doesn’t ask me some version of the question above. Many people don’t think of VC funds as a “business” – we get put in a different group called “investors” – but just like all the companies we invest in, Greycroft has a business plan, too. Every now and […]

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Market Mayhem: How The Markets May Have Affected Your Company’s Valuation—And What You Can Do About It

Posted on April 4th, 2016.

From time to time entrepreneurs ask us questions, not so much about their own operations, but more about outside forces that are putting pressure on their numbers. Here, I’m keeping it simple by answering the top three questions we get asked most often about the markets these days, explaining how they may have affected your […]

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The Seven Deadly Sins for Raising Capital

Posted on March 25th, 2016.

(Plus a few helpful hints) For one reason or another, many good companies have a hard time gaining traction with investors—their meetings fall flat, their messages go unanswered, or they get the “Let’s check back in a few quarters” routine. Of course, some of this is simply out of an entrepreneur’s control. Public stock prices […]

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A Year in Carbonite

Posted on January 22nd, 2016.

Back in college I interned at DLJ, an investment bank enshrined in the book Monkey Business. If you haven’t read Monkey Business it was one of the great exposes about life on Wall Street, including all-nighters, binge drinking, and every other good/bad thing that can be idealized. At DLJ I was a summer analyst, the […]

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The Illusory on Demand Economy

Posted on November 2nd, 2015.

Since the dawn of venture capital, VCs have funded ideas that seemed downright absurd at the time. The first cable company competed against free, over-the-air television. FedEx competed with the US postal service. Wireless carriers sunk billions of dollars into towers and spectrum before they could sign up a single subscriber. But each of these […]

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Ruminations

Posted on October 13th, 2015.

In 1972, Bobby Fisher played Boris Spassky for the title of world chess champion.  Game 6 of that series is arguably the greatest chess match of all time – Fisher played an unusual opening and later made a series of brilliant tactical moves that left Spassky with no choice but to resign.  At the end […]

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The Great Deflation

Posted on September 16th, 2015.

Back in 2011, my friend Geoff Judge introduced me to a start-up called Longtail Video.  At the time Longtail had a popular video player with 500K free users, and a smaller number of customers who had paid a one-time license fee.  It took a year of discussion before we finally invested behind a plan to […]

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Grocery Is Dead. Long Live Grocery!

Posted on March 22nd, 2015.

Welcome to the first installment of Greycroft Science, a blog post prepared in conjunction with Earnest Research. I would like to thank Lucy Wang, Masters candidate from NYU Courant, for her assistance in analysis and data science. There is no more familiar topic than grocery shopping. Literally everyone has done it. You probably haven’t spent […]

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The VC Fixer Upper

Posted on February 13th, 2015.

I had a visit from an entrepreneur yesterday who was deliberating about whether to take on a CEO job at a venture-backed company or start a new company from scratch.  The only problem was that the VC deal had some hair on it… $15MM of paid-in capital, nominal revenues, and just a few customers. I […]

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Foundational Technologies

Posted on January 15th, 2015.

Humans have always been farsighted, but few knew it until 1450. In 1450 Gutenberg invented the printing press and soon afterwards the masses were reading. Then people suddenly realized that they couldn’t read small print, which created a huge market for reading glasses. Reading glasses led to microscopes, which led to telescopes, which led to […]